BCTF Fact Sheet: African Elephants and the Bushmeat Trade

Authors: 
Stein, J. T. and Bushmeat Crisis Task Force
Document Type: 
peer review publication
Citation: 
Silver Spring, MD BCTF volume number pages 1-2 edition
Ref ID: 
967
Ref User: 
TobiasonAndy
Ref Type: 
Book
Year Published: 
2002
Date Input: 
8/26/2004 4:00 AM
Availability: 
Online at BCTF web site. Print-quality versions by
Location of Project: 
In File
Address: 
Bushmeat Crisis Task Force, 8403 Colesville Road, Suite 710, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Url: 
http://www.bushmeat.org/docs.html
Date Modified: 
8/28/2004 4:00 AM
Modified by: 
TobiasonAndy
Date Freeform: 
2003July
Last Post: 
8/28/2004 4:00 AM
Bushmeat Asian Type: 
bushmeat
Keywords: 
AFRICA; African; African elephant; Animal; BCTF; bushmeat; bushmeat trade; CENTRAL AFRICA; communities; community; elephant; elephants; HABITAT; habitat fragmentation; human; hunting; ivory; keystone species; market; population; protected area; protected areas; Task Force; TRADE
Abstract: 
African elephants are considered keystone species because of the pivotal role that they play in structuring the plant and animal communities where they reside. The continental decline of the African elephant and the contraction of its range have historically been associated with the ivory trade as well as habitat fragmentation due to human population expansion, and desertification. However, elephants are increasingly targets of the illegal market in bushmeat. Currently the majority of the elephants' range in Africa is outside of protected areas, particularly in Central Africa, where elephants are increasingly vulnerable to human encroachment and illegal hunting
© 1999-2009 Bushmeat Crisis Task Force