Battling a lethal trade

Authors: 
Conservation International - Ghana
Document Type: 
report
Citation: 
Conservation International volume Winter 2003 number pages - edition
Ref ID: 
833
Ref User: 
TobiasonAndy
Ref Type: 
Report
Year Published: 
2003
Sec Title: 
Conservation Frontlines
Date Input: 
8/26/2004 4:00 AM
Availability: 
full text in abstract, available in PDF with full, Full text is available at hyperlinks listed, or request a digital or printed copy from BCTF.
Location of Project: 
In File
Url: 
http://www.conservation.org/xp/frontlines/2003/winter/features/focus/focus.xml
Date Modified: 
8/28/2004 4:00 AM
Modified by: 
TobiasonAndy
Date Freeform: 
2003/05/30/
Last Post: 
8/28/2004 4:00 AM
Bushmeat Asian Type: 
bushmeat
Keywords: 
Accra; act; AFRICA; Animal; antelope; antelopes; BIODIVERSITY; biodiversity conservation; bushmeat; bushmeat trade; CI; communities; community; CONSERVATION; culture; ECOSYSTEM; endangered; endangered species; enforcement; extinction; FARMING; FOOD; food security; Ghana; government; grasscutters; health; hunter; hunters; hunting; INCOME; livestock; mammals; market; meat; media; population; primate; protein; rural communities; Task Force; totem; TRADE; traditional; TRAFFIC; weapons; WEST AFRICA; WHO; WILDLIFE; wildlife trade; women
Abstract: 
Battling a lethal trade CI-Ghana takes aim at a practice that is devastating the country's wildlife and poisoning the population The bushmeat sellers had heard enough. In an exodus punctuated by angry shouts and clanging chairs, the disgruntled first ladies of Ghana's bustling wildlife trade marched out of the conference room and appeared ready to abandon the proceedings altogether. The scene: Ghana's first-ever national conference on the bushmeat crisis, organized by CI-Ghana, Ghana's Bushmeat Task Force and supported by CI's International Communications team and the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund, to curb a trade that is driving much of Ghana's wildlife to extinction. More than 200 tribal leaders, government officials and scientists, as well as a sizable contingent of so-called "market queens" were on hand. The queens, bushmeat sellers who ply their wares in Ghana's open markets, act as a conduit between hunter and consumer. Their cooperation is critical in any attempt to curb t
© 1999-2009 Bushmeat Crisis Task Force